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Osteria Tedesca

By

  • COX Architecture

Description

Tedesca is a restaurant of memory. Built fabric entwines past and present, binding them inseparably to evoke memories of experience, place, and atmosphere. It is architecture as apparatus, facilitating connection, taking visitors to a place where art, wine, nature, architecture, food and fire forge memories on the strongest foundations.

Tedesca reminds us of our place in the natural environment, that bounty is not guaranteed; that food, water and building materials are precious. Shaped from within and without, anchored by a single hand-drawn floor plan, it is an extended work of improvisation, a continuing feedback loop of design, celebration and reflection.

Key Features

1

Space is shaped from within and without, imbuing the building with character anchored by a single hand-drawn floorplan, an extended work of improvisation, a constant feedback loop of design, reflection and informed correction.

Tedesca was a test bed for process. Shaping spaces with items collected, commissioned or made by the project team produced an uncommonly textured space, layered with lustrous objects of vastly varying opacities, reflectivity and form. Combining the outcomes of this process with fine-art level craftsmanship of the ancient redgum bar, kitchen and dining-table pieces forms the foundation of how Tedesca achieves more with less material resources.

2

Tedesca celebrates design that delivers intense experiences with fewer resources, creating vivid new analogue memories for a digital world.

Every design decision was made to enhance the human experience of space and place. Embedding a sense of wonder and a celebration of journey and process.

Objects were made specifically for the project, bought second-hand or repurposed, allowing for genuinely original interior compositions and objects imbued with a presence originating from their history of use or from the hands of their makers, reducing the culture of acquisition by replacing bought products with purposeful design that provides both environmental and aesthetic benefit.

3

Every element was handpicked to honour the ethos of the venue and spirit of the place it inhabits, celebrating a passion for food, hospitality, art and craft.

Anchored by a singular hand-drawn plan, construction became an extended work of improvisation, made possible by the skill and commitment of architect, chef, builder and furniture maker, affording a constant feedback loop of design, reflection and informed correction.
The design is inextricably linked to the purposeful way food and wine is so lovingly produced. Emphasising sensory subtleties and nuances of experience that allow space to take centre stage. Slow food meets slow architecture.

4

Tedesca aimed to use objects made specifically for the project, bought second hand or repurposed, allowing for genuinely original interior compositions and imbuing objects with a presence that originates either in history of use, or in the hands of their makers. We also undertook to reduce the culture of acquisition, replacing bought products with purposeful design for environmental and aesthetic benefit. Our team were directly responsible for creating a number of shelving pieces, joinery items and the front door of the restaurant by hand, an a direct and rewarding way of designing custom pieces that benefit our clients.

5

Tedesca’s design process demonstrates a new way of executing commercial architecture. At the outset we asked ourselves what we could derive from a regional context and unsurprisingly the answers were unpredictable and rich; the equation of what is scarce and what is plentiful that we take for granted as designers in the city is set in disarray. For our practice, it marked the beginning of a new era of responsible design, shaping architecture around what is truly required to create phenomenal spaces. This is less about selecting sustainable materials than it is about minimising excess and doing more with less.

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